CU/IP: Catch-up over IP

The Places We've Lived

June 16, 2020 Sam Rose, Rhys Jeffs Season 1 Episode 3
CU/IP: Catch-up over IP
The Places We've Lived
Chapters
00:00:25
Horrible House Stories
00:13:44
Smart Mirrors
00:18:43
The Joys of Moving House
00:32:32
University Accommodation
00:38:54
Childhood Homes
00:50:03
Dating Housemates
00:59:05
Childhood Homes (Redux!)
CU/IP: Catch-up over IP
The Places We've Lived
Jun 16, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Sam Rose, Rhys Jeffs

In this episode we talk about the houses and places we've lived over the years, how much fun moving house is, why you shouldn't date housemates, and more!

We feel like this episode is up hitting our stride a little, and think that future episodes will be more in this style: a monthly theme that has us exploring our past in different ways.

Let us know if you enjoy it, or have feedback!

Rhys: https://twitter.com/rhysjeffs
Sam: https://twitter.com/samwhoo

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode we talk about the houses and places we've lived over the years, how much fun moving house is, why you shouldn't date housemates, and more!

We feel like this episode is up hitting our stride a little, and think that future episodes will be more in this style: a monthly theme that has us exploring our past in different ways.

Let us know if you enjoy it, or have feedback!

Rhys: https://twitter.com/rhysjeffs
Sam: https://twitter.com/samwhoo

Sam:

Hello and welcome to episode three of catchup over IP. My name is Sam Rose and I'm joined by Reece Jeff say hi, Reese.

Rhys:

hello?

Sam:

And we are going to be talking about places that we've lived in this episode and things like, have you ever had a kind of house disaster where something has gone tremendously wrong, or if you had a funny kind of house hunting story, things like that. So, Reese, can you think of a time where something has gone horrifically wrong in your house?

Rhys:

So there was one. A shade housing house that I lived in a university with, uh, three or four other guys. And, uh, uh, like, like most student housing. That's off-campus it was a converted house. Uh, so the bathroom, uh, was actually a, it was like a conservatory sold off. It was like built on the outside, like a house extension that had been added on. Right. So, uh, you know, the type of room in, in, in a house where, you know, someone's just added your own, they haven't, uh, insulated it properly. It's always perpetually cold. Even in the heart of summer. It's the coldest room in the house. It was that sort of, um, place. So we moved in, in, in, in the summer, uh, three or four of us and. That was fine, you know, a little bit, a little bit chilly in the mornings when you have your morning shower, but, uh, fine through the summer. Oh my God. Turn winter. Uh, not only was it AC cold, but this was just open air in there all the time. So we had all sorts of mold and stuff growing. There was one time when, um, a category in, from outside and was just w we couldn't figure out how he was getting in, but he was getting in repeatedly.

Sam:

And this, this is still the bathroom you're talking

Rhys:

Yeah, bathroom. So in the morning, you know, Oh, and the electrics are all weird in this room as well. So we had a tumble dryer on washing machine, in the same room. Right. And.

Sam:

in the bathroom.

Rhys:

Yes. And it was on the outside of the building. Right? So, so the shower was on the inside of this room, like still, what would be the outside of the house before this extension? So the shower was on the, uh, inside of this weird room, but then the washing machine and dryer were on the outside and God knows how the electrics wrote there. Cause the wall was just like a little bit thicker than cardboard by the look of it. Um, Yeah.

Sam:

so I lived in a similar to you. It was like kind of converted house, but I think it had been split down the middle as well. So somewhat house had turned into two and then it was both of them are rented and shared by a few people. And this is at university. It was on, um, Do you remember? It was really close to the university. This is a recent, I went to the same university, albeit not quite at the same time, it was very close to the Gates. It was bridge street. If you know where that was

Rhys:

Yes.

Sam:

it was not in a great part of town. We were, we were a few doors down from a, from a pub that when it wasn't boarded up, it was. Full of extremely aggressive looking people. No, like fights quite regularly and stuff like that.

Rhys:

I used to go there sometimes. Well,

Sam:

you really?

Rhys:

Yeah, I, it got revamped. If you remember

Sam:

I'm sure. Yeah. When I was born in it for a long time and then it got taken over again, right?

Rhys:

am I right in saying that was called the bridge? Yeah.

Sam:

Yeah, and it was next to a bridge. It was classic Welsh inspired naming, but that house was horrible. I was kind of a bit blind to it because I was, I was still a student. I was quite happy to be away from home, gaining independence and all that kind of thing, but The carpets in. It were amazing. They were so old and so dirty that if you, if you walk around the house barefoot or in like white socks, the bottom of your feet, or your socks would just become pure black, like not even just dirty, just a layer of black that you could scrape off with your fingernail.

Rhys:

Yeah, you could squad Jesus. See, so what are you doing right now is it's been a while since I've lived anywhere with carpeting, I've kind of got a little bit upstairs with it, but, uh, I missed that feeling when I was a kid of just having big, thick, fluffy carpet that you could go barefoot on and have it between your toes. You're just killed this. I mean know, thinking about that. What was, this was,

Sam:

with your toes,

Rhys:

was just blue, black goo. Was it.

Sam:

just black dirt. I'd accumulated over the presumably millions of years. That house had been there.

Rhys:

How many students do you think it lived in that house over the years? How many?

Sam:

I dread to think it was, was so, so disgusting. There was a front room as well. That looked like it was straight out of that 1970s coronation street and set it. It was flowery upholstery, flowery wallpaper, flowery currents. We never went in there. We just used it as a storage, but it was a horrendously decorated room. What else would call about that house? The stairs were weirdly small. So, you know, sometimes you get steps that are really kind of big, really big. These steps were weirdly small. It was almost like a ramp

Rhys:

Isn't it upsetting, like, like isn't it strange how you can immediately tell if there's something off with days, if there's anything at the slightest impact it's like, hang on a minute. Those are not British standard Institute compliance steps. It's something's wrong here. Yeah. Like, like when you go to like a castle or something, right. There's something out of antiquity yellow, you claiming a tower or something, you know that that's when you notice that you're like, that's not right.

Sam:

I hate it. When, you know, sometimes you'll go up some stairs and the oldest, the carpet on the steps is, is kept in place by kind of spikes and you step.

Rhys:

Oh

Sam:

And you actually feel the spike through your feet. That is horrible. I can't understand the people that live in houses, but that is the case. I would fix that shit immediately because that you all of a sudden, you're scared of going upstairs. Cause you can get stamped in the toe.

Rhys:

Have you ever fitted them?

Sam:

Of course I haven't fucking fitted though. Look at me.

Rhys:

There we go. You and me the two, most like a non handymen DIY thing, but I've fitted carpet before. And those carpets spikes them vicious mate. They're they're like,

Sam:

Yeah, I know the

Rhys:

and there they'd look designed to kill seriously. Yeah.

Sam:

I can't believe you fitted carpet. Why.

Rhys:

In, uh, so, Oh, how did I forget this? So I have lived somewhere with some catastrophic things wrong, uh, when I was a teenager, late teenager. So from the age of 16, until about 20, uh, I lived in one after the other three different flats in a converted pub. So this was a pub that had been converted into five flats. And one, after the other, I lived in three of those, uh, flats and the landlord was like touch. So we used to do all our own DIY in them. Uh, so I helped fit cop at once in one of those. But, uh, yeah, that place was a catastrophe. Um, so right way to begin here. So my favorite place I ended up there was a w the entire loft had been converted into a flat, and it was great. It was huge, right. Uh, which is great, except, um, The, uh, it had a spare room, which also doubled as one of the exits out of it. Uh, so where you had to do in their spare room, which was like an odd geometric shape was you had to pull up the, the floor like trapdoor, and that was his steps to get out. Um, except because remembering that this was a converted pub, it was a stone exterior, and all the rooms were just divided by a wooden, you know, MDF like the thinnest. Drywall stuff you can possibly imagine. So this room you'd step on the floorboards and it was worse than being in the attic. Right. It was like everything would Creek. Uh, and uh, there was, there was a, like, there was an air flow in this room. Right. And there was no reason for it, but it was a gap around the building or whatever. There was just flowing air into this empty space around this room. Um, now that wasn't so bad, the worst one was for a while. I lived on the ground floor apartment there. Uh, so that was like half the floor of this converted pub. None of the pub stuff was there anymore. Right. It was fully converted this one, uh, but one winter at the start of winter as well, we noticed it was starting to smell. So it was always like a little bit of a damp, uh, you know, you, you know, the thing when it's not really like a smell, but there's a bit of dampness and you kind of feel it in the air.

Sam:

Yeah. Yeah.

Rhys:

So it had that sort of sense to it. But the beginning of winter, one year, it just started to smell a little bit. We're like, that's weird. It smells a bit like sewage. That's a bit odd and we kind of left it and uh, we called, uh, the landlord to arrange something to come out of a locally, like, look, it's just a damn bombardment. Make sure it's, well, it keep it dry and all this other stuff. And then one morning I wake up for a school and I go and, uh, Walk out through the living room. And I noticed my feet were a little bit wet and I'm like, that's odd. I'm all over. The carpet was soaking. And I'm like, I don't understand. This had been after like a week of rain or something. I'm like, this is really odd. So I was living with my father there at the time. I was like 16 years old or something. And, uh, We call someone out to have a look. Basically what had happened was when this pump was converted, all of the BSL, or instead of filling it in with concrete, like they were meant to, they just threw all of the scraps and stuff in there, right? Like all of the broken. Stone and all of the old wood and everything else, or the plaster and all that. And gradually over the course of decades, this thing had gradually like all wet. Every time it rained and filled up, like, cause of all this empty space there was in it and it got right to the very top and we're starting to spill over into our living room. Right.

Sam:

you got like prehistoric water in your living room.

Rhys:

So it was converted in the mid nineties. So when I was there, let's see. So I was 16. So that would have been, uh, 2001. 2001, 2002. So it was probably a, I was wrong to say decades and it probably would have been about six or seven years worth of water and gradually filled up. So that was when that was when we moved on to the top floor. And then the bottom floor was out of action for like a year. They had builders in like for, for about a year, resolving that, because imagine that, imagine trying to clear all of that out after that log. How many rats are in there? God. Yeah.

Sam:

speaking of speaking of rats, have I told you that, uh, through our house? Had mice up until very recently. I think we've, we've fixed the problem now, but we about two or three weeks ago, I think roughly around the time we were recording the last episode we were, we were hearing the kind of like pitter patter of mice and the scratching in the walls and stuff like that. And it makes you feel like itchy and horrible. And, we try to combat the problem ourselves. We put Travis Dan and stuff like that. but we. We were kind of catching them faster than we can get traps. And after a while we decided, yeah, we need to get a professional involved. Cause we we've got almost 10 of these things and it, the guy, the guy pulls up outside our house, he's there and he's like mask and his gloves and stuff like that. And it gets out of his car. And the first thing he says, he was like, Oh, so that's how they're getting in. Do you think? And we were like, Hmm, what? And he pointed at the. Wall right next to our downstairs toilet. And there's just a big fucking hole in it we'd never noticed before, but it must have been kind of a pipe that I'd run outside previously that they'd removed the pipe from, but hadn't really bothered filling it in. It just meant that you'd put his hand in it and stuff. And she went straight into the cavity wall and you're like, Holy crap. I didn't realize that was even there. And then he found another one around the back of the house, and then he also found a mouse nest behind our shed. So he was like, yeah, you've got mice. Knew that. But he goes back to one of the previous things you're saying as well, because, uh, another one of the ways they were getting in was under our garage door, uh, quite, quite large cap that apparently mice only need something like. It was something absurd, like 50 millimeters now it's quite big. Isn't it? It was something like 10 millimeters or eight millimeters gap to, they can crawl under and the garish, or had quite a lot of clearance. And he said to me, he's like, are you much of a DIY person? I was like, no,

Rhys:

did you not even try to fake it? Did you know if they like you you're they're wearing, like, I dunno like a Google tee shirt or something or a Linux t-shirt going like, well, you know, I've, I I've chopped some wood in my time. I've uh, I've built it. Put up some shelves. Yep. Yep. Yep. Sprockets. Yeah.

Sam:

There is a mirror that we bought about two years ago and it's in. So when my wife was pregnant with her son, I would, I was keeping a kind of photo journal of the whole thing. And in one of them, this mirror is kind of like on the floor, leaning against the wall in the background. And the entry of that journal I put in was like, this mirror probably still isn't hung. But even if you're reading this 10 years from now, this mirror is still pro and it's in our dining room. Now, it hasn't been hung up because I don't know what I'm doing. So I need to get someone to do that. I'm just not, not DIY at all. So he fitted a strip to the bottom of our garage door that it's like a brush. I'm sure you've seen them on

Rhys:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah.

Sam:

make sure nothing gets underneath them. Um, so we haven't had my since then, but she's pretty good, but I didn't, I didn't want to mess around. So Sophie was like, yeah, let's just, let's see if we can solve the problem ourselves. It's not usually how I operate. Normally. I'm like, if there's a problem, I want to get the most qualified person I could find to solve that problem for me, because I don't know what I'm doing.

Rhys:

failing getting the most qualified person, getting literally any person to just give some money to and just make the problem. Go away. Please say know.

Sam:

Exactly that is, that is usually my solution to two things. I am very good at programming and I am awful at everything else.

Rhys:

have you considered, you know, turning that into a smart mirror that would engage you and get you to, you know, do some DIY ish things,

Sam:

what the fuck would a smart mirror do?

Rhys:

have you not seen these? This is like a Coleman DIY project people do in

Sam:

Don't tell me this is a thing.

Rhys:

Swear to God. It's a thing. You make a mirror, uh, with a raspberry pie. Uh, I'm not sure how they work. I know my mate made one. My one mate, mate spent like three months doing it for a present for his girlfriend and she dumped him not long after. I think they use a projector on like the side of the, uh, glass on one side of the glass of the mirror and it projects up off the material and it gives you like a, a display of say, today's weather. If it's in the bathroom or something. Oh, your shed deal. And all that. You're

Sam:

my American have like, like a hood

Rhys:

I had, yeah. Yeah, absolutely.

Sam:

Oh, Lou Dao.

Rhys:

So, so if this is your first piece of a, you know, first time learning about this, think about what sort of things you would put on there. If this was you. So every morning you're getting up, if you're anything like me, you're bumping into things, you finally get to the shower. You're just like, yeah, whatever. What would you have on the mirror for that moment? When you come back and you wipe it down a little bit to just set you up for the day.

Sam:

So realistically, so obviously the first answer would be a really handsome picture of me

Rhys:

wow,

Sam:

look past the, the morning PTSD of waking up.

Rhys:

that would be good. Give you like a target. Right? So I got all these tools, all of these products I've got in the bathroom. I've got to go from this to that.

Sam:

yeah, it's like tracing paper. I think realistically, the information that I want is like, have I received any new emails? What calendar stuff? If I got like sometimes because, uh, the company workforce, mostly in Europe and the time zone, sometimes don't line up. Somebody will schedule a meeting that starts like an hour before I normally start work and it'll get to, so normally I start working at around 10 and I worked through to seven and. Sometimes I will realize that nine Oh five, I've got a nine o'clock meeting. I say, Oh, buttocks. It would be good to learn that before. It's a problem

Rhys:

yeah.

Sam:

because I don't have my work calendar, my phone, I haven't got my work, anything in my phone. Uh, so it would be good to have it somewhere. That's not necessarily, you cannot ping at me and steal my focus, but just somewhere I can actually see it sometimes. Oh, don't make me build a smart mirror. I haven't got time.

Rhys:

are you actually intrigued by the idea? You know? Cause I thought about

Sam:

now you've said it. this mirror is intended to go over our fireplace. So it might not be the best place for it.

Rhys:

Hmm.

Sam:

It's not the kind of mirror you could hang in a bathroom. It was like a proper, like it's got a complete wooden frame and it's quite big.

Rhys:

So I wonder if there's something that would be useful to have in your, uh, in your living room like that. I dunno. So when you have people around or whatever, and they just, uh, standing in front of the mirror just doing something, I don't know, I'd have to think about that. I bet you could do something cool to live, to enter into a little photo booth or something, but also special effects.

Sam:

yeah. Oh, that'd be, that'd be an interesting project, but you, so you you've lived in your current place for quite a long time now. Right? Like I remember being there when I was in university, which was 750,000 years ago at this point.

Rhys:

So I've lived here for six and a half years now.

Sam:

Nice. Have you made many kind of modifications to it or is it because it's still renting? Isn't it? So it's

Rhys:

well, I broke the accidental light. Uh that's about the only modification I've personally made. No, uh, no, no, really. I put up some of my own pictures. Um, I've got a smart light bulb thing in the lamp. Um, you know, even furniture wise, it was a furnished apartment. So I didn't really pick most of my furniture. I

Sam:

it really? I thought that was your furniture.

Rhys:

No. So the bit, that's my furniture. It's just my computer desk, which isn't ready to compute a desk. It's a, it's an Ikea kitchen top that I've just explained over some desks, some desk roles.

Sam:

That's a common thing. People do. I know two or three people are going the same thing.

Rhys:

well, that was it. I was looking around for a decent desk, uh, and I was like, right, what's good. What are the, what are the supernodes I've, you know, the streamers and all that sort of stuff. And they always got stuff that's custom. But then I was looking at actual desks thinking, let me just, let me just, alright. I don't mind paying double, just give me a decent desk and little crap. They don't tiny, like, and not just tiny in terms of, uh, breadth, but depth. And I really didn't like that idea, right? Like I'm forever looking for space on my desk. It's why I like these tiny keyboards, uh, are just like, how do you have a big, where do you go to get a big desk anymore? And I just couldn't figure it out, but I looked around and there were a few people on, um, there's a subreddit called battle stations, which is great for your whole desk set up. And a lot of people were recommending Ikea kitchen tops like this. So I went to Ikea pick the first one that looked huge and manageable. Uh, I don't re also super heavy. Like, I don't know why they make these things out of like, cause I've held wood before and I've held wood of this size before this is like steel or something seriously. Um, but yeah, that's right there. So I Kia kitchen top. I got two sets of drawers, either side of it. That's my it's my computer desk. And it's fantastic.

Sam:

you got, so you haven't moved house in six and a half years then, because something, you said that, so moving house is a pain. I, so I'm going to try and count actually. So I, I grew up in Wales and I lived in the house that I was brought up in until I was 18 and moved to university. So that was one. And then in university, I moved back home once a year and then back to university once year. So it's twice a year. Uh, and back then everything fit into the back of a Citron C4. Those were the fucking days. Uh, but that was always good. Fun. Uh, putting everything back down into boxes and moving your life across the country. Cause I grew up in North Wales. I went to university in South Wales, uh, which is kind of a 200, 250 mile drive. Something like that. Then. Can I move to London and then I have in London, I have moved as a, wants to London, then two, three,

Rhys:

four times through

Sam:

I moved once. Yeah. Four times through London and then once out of London to my current house. So I think in total, in my life, I've moved sort of in the region of 15 times. Oh my God, the shit you go through to move house. It's unbelievable. I'm so fortunate. I have had some good friends to help. Most of the times I've done it. But the, when I said the last time that I moved in London, I moved in with my then girlfriend. Now wife. Uh, her, Oh God, her flats are shit hot. That's that's another one with some good stories behind it. She lived in, she lived in a dump wished she hadn't cleaned for the 10 years that she'd

Rhys:

your current wife's apartment I've been there.

Sam:

Have you ready?

Rhys:

Yeah, I remember. I, uh, I didn't did I stay over one? So did I visit once I did. It was, it was, um,

Sam:

remember that.

Rhys:

it was relatively small, but it was in a lush little gated thing with,

Sam:

Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. Well, it's, I wouldn't say it's a lush gated thing, but it was a gated thing.

Rhys:

I loved that area. It was beautiful there.

Sam:

Oh, the areas, what so is in Pimlico, which is a fantastic area of London. You've got the gardens, you've got great restaurants and stuff like that. Like it's, it's associated with people that are caught like shitloads of money, but that gated community was a key worker community. So my wife had moved in 10 years prior, under rent control. So rent could not go up more than inflation. So she was essentially. Like living there for free almost. It was so cheap considering what it should have been. It cost about a seventh of what it should have cost realistically at market rates, which is unbelievable. We were so fortunate. We were able to save up a lot of money throughout for our house, which was really nice, but the whole place was single glazed. Let's just start that in winter. It was like freezing every single day. And then in summer it was boiling every single day. The, the layer of it was one big rectangle. So if you. Start at the top, you've got the bathroom and then the bathroom was literally, you couldn't split your legs in there. Like it was so thin and tiny. And then you got the bathroom. When you're in the shallow room, you can't the shower room. You're in the kitchen. You come out of the kitchen, you're in some kind of weird vestibule. And then after one side, you've got the bedroom and then down again, you've got the living room and this whole thing was like completely tiny, smaller than the room you're sat in by far.

Rhys:

you're making it sound horrible. I didn't think it was horrible when I visited it

Sam:

Oh, it was so like, the windows were rotting around the frames. Like they literally pushed them and they actually moved like in the frame

Rhys:

well, I suppose I didn't do a thorough building inspection when I was there. I didn't go around the window frames. That is true. I might've missed that, that element of it, but I remember it being all right. It was a little bit cozy. It was like most London places too thin. Right. So it was like, it just felt a little bit, but it was all

Sam:

She also had a, she had, you know, everyone's got a mail drawer where you get a letter through the post. You don't want to read it and you put it in the mail drawer, you open it and you look at it and you put it in the mail drawer

Rhys:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. I've got the floor. Yeah.

Sam:

but the mail drawer filled up and there isn't the kitchen. It's one of these ones where there was a cabinet. A big cabinet below it and then draws on top and the kitchen, the male drawer through use and putting stuff in it and opening it and closing it had spilled slowly over time into the cabinet. And when you open the cabinet mail just fell out. It was like a full cabinet of mail. It was unbelievable. But the time where I. So we moved into her place and then a year or so after that we bought a house and we moved into that house, but so she hadn't moved for ages. So she had accumulated quite a lot of stuff in that small space, uh, half of it, of which we bend, but some of the furniture she had, she has this solid Oak table, which weighs the universe it's unbelievably having. And she was a second floor flat. And we didn't get anybody to move forward. As we actually carried all that stuff down the stairs and it was a nightmare and we we'd hired a van and all my friends who kindly offered to drive it because I don't drive. We got everything down the stairs, van loaded stuff into the van and everything, apart from this goddamn fucking table fit in the fan. And we drove two and a half hours to the house two and a half hours back to pick up just this fucking table and then two and a half hours back to the house again. And it says an operation that began at midday. Went all the way through to about three in the morning, we actually kind of got back into the house with everything at three in the three in the morning. And it was, it was a great feeling, obviously, because you knew bought a house and it's amazing kind of like Rite of passage in life and stuff like that. But we, we, we we've bought a Chinese takeaway and we sat on the floor of the living room, no furniture in it, uh, and ate this Chinese takeaway. And it was, uh, it was a great moment and people that had helped us move. Uh, later kind of a couple of years later after that also bought a house in the same road and came to move next to us, which was really lovely. And we help them move in, obviously, and, and after they'd finished, we also got, got a Chinese from the same place and ate it on their floor with no furniture or anything. It was, uh, yeah, it was really kind of a symbolic moment.

Rhys:

I think it's a Rite of passage when I moved here. So, uh, I live in a gated community now, uh, that makes it sound like it's more, uh,

Sam:

Your gated community is lovely. You like the differences between the w the Gator community that I was in, in London, it was all residential. So it was something on the order of like 120 odd flats in it. And the Gator community that that Reese lives in is, is like there's restaurants and there's bars. And it's quite, it's quite well architected. Like, it's nice to look at it. It's got layers to it and fly over and balconies and stuff.

Rhys:

so I went to somewhere similar in London a little while ago, near economy street was the.

Sam:

um,

Rhys:

I don't know if there's some

Sam:

is fantastic.

Rhys:

Similar sort of thing to that. Imagine there's a big gate. Um, but, uh, there were loads like little, you know, pedestrianized in semi enclosed restaurant sort of areas like that. And that's the sort of thing that I live in, but the one I live in is surrounded by a pedestrian area of the city as well. So, so my problem is you can't get any way close with a car. Uh, so moving in was a bit of a nightmare. So what I did was, uh, First of all planned well in advance actually ended up being homeless for months before I moved in and I lived out of a hotel for a month, which was, uh, not great. Yeah. I

Sam:

Remember your previous house.

Rhys:

Yeah. So actually that's a story worth telling, I guess so, so my, my problem here was that I was, uh, I was switching, I was moving to a different city. I, my PhD, I was switching from being full time to part time. I was effectively leaving my full time employment in, uh, the university and joining a private company in a different city. So, uh, I was pretty desperate. I had everything planned out in terms of employment and, uh, I was pretty desperate to find somewhere that I could move to on, uh, Roughly a specific day around about a specific week. Uh, so I started doing house viewings, went to six or seven house viewings found the one I wanted. It was my dream apartment. Uh, it was a corner apartment in an apartment block. The block had like a concierge. There was a car park underneath, it had its own gym, its own pool. It was a big corner apartment with like two balconies on two different sides of the building really city center. Well, we're not recording. I'll tell you where it was. Exactly. So you can, uh, thing, uh, it was fantastic. Um, the rent, there was less than what I'm paying in this place. And when I started paying in this place, uh, way back when as well, this was it. This was the place I wanted to live. So I signed a copy of the lease, but they did tell me they were like, look, the landlord's not gonna be able to sign this for a while because he's on holiday. But when he gets back, don't worry, we'll be the first thing he does. I'm like, is there any risk? This is going to blow up. Like whatever. They're like, no, no, no, no. Don't worry about me. I was like, great. So I go back home to, where I lived near Treforest the university of South Wales and, the, the lending agency, then I was like, ha fuck you finally, after all this time, they were horrible. Those people are right. I think, I don't think there was a good letting agency in town. I was like, screw you. I'm out of here. Here's the date I'm leaving. And about a week before that date, uh, my. Soon to be landlord returns from holiday. And I get word through the people who would be the letting agency there've been arranging this way. And they said, Oh, we're really awfully, sorry. The landlord's come back. He's found another renter for it. Uh, so unfortunately we're going to you, you, don't your leases. Invalid was, what am I meant to do? I'm about to be homeless, right? Uh, so they were like, yeah, sorry. It turns out he was actually renting it to his, uh, nephew, I think for like half the rent, he was going to be charging me. So I was extremely, uh, pissed off, but also extremely terrified because I had about a week to try to make alternative arrangements. Um, I didn't really know what to do. So I ramped up to the house viewings, trying to find a place immediately. Obviously you can't find somewhere to live in a week's notice, but, uh, the best I could find was the place where I now live, uh, which I found, eh, of the 10 places I looked at in that week. Not only was it the only one which is, which was anywhere close to living in, it was also the most expensive. And it was, uh, it was available in a little bit over a month in five weeks time, I think. So I then went back to the forest, packed up everything I could, uh, deposited as much as I could in people's houses. Right. My friends and stuff. It was like, can you put these boxes behind the sofa for a few weeks? and I packed up a suitcase and I went and checked into a hotel, the blueberry hotel in Pontypridd for a month. And I lived out of a hotel for a month while I waited for my new apartment to open up, uh,

Sam:

But that story writes itself. As soon as you said, is there any chance this could explode

Rhys:

yes. And the thing is, you know, when you're academia, it's like a sheltered life, right? When you're a student, you first have your first few tiptoes into independent life, but you still kind of feel like nothing can really go wrong. Nothing can really. Fuck up your life at this point. That's what we feel like everything's gonna work out somehow. So they're at that point when I'm like, well, hang on a minute, these leases exist for a reason. Right? The other person has got a say in it too. when they tell you, don't worry about it, I'll be fine. You know, you just kind of go, well, you know? Yeah. Nothing bad things don't usually happen. This'll be,

Sam:

They wouldn't lie to me.

Rhys:

Yeah. But I would go less than that, but it was great living out of a hotel for a month. Uh, it didn't.

Sam:

I remember you talking about how it was great. BR people are changing. My towels and people are changing my bedding. It's wonderful.

Rhys:

Yeah, it was, it was extremely expensive. The thing, the thing, like the people don't clock a lot because you stay in hotels when you're traveling or maybe if you're for work or you're on holiday or whatever. the hotels themselves, we have the hotel costs in our head food trying to stay alive. You know, when you're eating at a restaurant every day, That's not cheap, even if it's just breakfast or anything,

Sam:

Yeah.

Rhys:

but then you've got to eat every day. So how do you do it? Right. So I was living off sandwiches and cold foods and stuff by the end of that month, you know, like, like little pasta salads, you bio to Tesco and stuff was my dinner every night.

Sam:

He didn't poop for weeks.

Rhys:

Oh, I think it was the opposite. Actually. I think I was pooping like a. Well, my bodily fluids were just trying to get out of me at that point. But, but, but the bit that made me recall that was when I finally did move in here, it was a bit of a team effort because again, cause the pedestrianized stay grad, all my friends, having to lug stuff, halfway across town to get here. But the last set of things were things. My father helped me move in. Now my father has celiac disease. Uh, so, uh, and plus he's older and he's had a number of heart attacks. So it was really kind of him to help me out with all this sort of stuff. But finally, after the last frantic two days, getting all my stuff moved in here, we were sat here. The place was empty. My boxes were all over the place. We had a sofa, at least I was like, let's go grab us a pizza. So, uh, we ordered. Two pizzas from rocket Joe's Oh, by the way, I'm never gonna rocket Joe pizza by the way. And it was terrible, but, uh, they arrived and after all that effort here, like, Oh my God, this is the best pizza in the world. And we're halfway through eating it. We're both exhausted. And, uh, I was like, Hey dad, isn't it. Gluten in pizza. Anyway. Ah, fuck. And then he threw this pizza slice though. He's like, Ah, I fucked, you know, and he's like, that's it. I got to go home now. And my dad doesn't really have outburst of emotion like this, but he was kicking himself and I was like, well, what's going to happen. You know? And he's like, Oh, I'm just going to be on the toilet all night sooner. I go now with a better hand while I want to. And that was it. That was why it was this nice little memory forming of like, here we go. He's helped me moved in there. Thank you. Dad's yeah. Great. And spoiled it by sudden burst of diarrhea. Yeah.

Sam:

I hate when that happens. I. Remember the first kind of place I lived in university cause the, the university you went to the halls of residence. Um, I'm not sure if that's like a U S thing or as well, but in the UK, there's usually accommodation on campus as well. And the called the halls, the residence and hours. In university of South Wales was split into tears of, you know, you had

Rhys:

Class.

Sam:

accommodation,

Rhys:

Wow. It was class.

Sam:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, you saw them, right? Like the, it was, it was amazing as well because it, all the stuff, it was a big Hill. Cause it's whales and this big Hills everywhere. At the top of the Hill was where the ball is worth at the bottom of the Hill was where I was. And it, it, the gradient in price was the same as how far up the Hill you were. So we call it the top of the Hill, Beverly Hills, the bottom of the Hill was called the ghetto. And I live in the ghetto.

Rhys:

this sounds like Snowpiercer

Sam:

it was, it was, it was amazing. I can't believe I haven't heard of this. And the, so the ghetto was 45 pounds a week. I think, which I thought was really expensive. Cause I didn't, I wasn't used to rent, but it's actually fucking nothing.

Rhys:

pounds a week, 180 pounds a month.

Sam:

It's amazing. Uh, and that at the top of the Hill, you were paying between 95 and like 165, depending on how Bali you wanted to be, which I thought was absolutely obscenely expensive. And this was also in South Wales. So it's, uh, you know, it is meant to be cheaper, but my car, those prices are fantastic. And they're really nice. The combination was actually really nice, even though student accommodation, they split them into blocks of. Can you share a flat with like four of the people and you've all got a shared kitchen. You've got your own bathrooms and your own separate rooms. It's really quite nice. And then the ghetto is split into floors. So it's almost like a prison where, uh, there's something in the region of 16 to 30, two of you per floor, all sharing one shower, block,

Rhys:

Good

Sam:

sharing water, kitchen. Um,

Rhys:

How many showers were in the shallow block?

Sam:

I think there were three

Rhys:

That's still a lot of contention. If everyone's going to

Sam:

as, Oh yeah. The way that we got around that. So they've made some effort to put people on similar courses, close to each other so that there was, I was at the end of one of these corridors and I was with three other computer science students. So we had our own little like cluster where we all kind of relatively got along. And then there was some, there's a two people studying sports science, uh, a guy studying criminology, uh, two people studying psychology. And I think that's somebody studying biology or something like that. So a reasonable spread of people didn't get along with any of them more or less. Uh, not that we didn't like them, but we just didn't really interact all that much that you bump into during the kitchen. It's like, Oh, Hey, how are you doing that kind of thing? But overall, yeah, I didn't talk to them. It was just our little cluster of computer science people. Some of us became pretty good friends. Uh, one of us was a complete knob. Uh, we ended up living with him and that we didn't know how much ridiculous until we live with him,

Rhys:

Do you want to mention names here? Would I know these

Sam:

no, no, even if I, I don't think you'd know them anyway, because I think by the time I met you and become friends with you, that I stopped being friends with this guy. But the, the accommodation itself was, was horrific. I, again, it was something I didn't realize because I hadn't really lived away from home until then. And it was fantastic to me because I, I, I had been extremely keen to get away from home anyway. Like I was looking forward to independence. That's something I was ready for and I really wanted. And when my mom dropped me off at university, obviously it's very, I didn't appreciate how emotional that moment was until I had a baby. But now me thinking about doing that with my baby, I'm like my God, I couldn't, I completely understand how my mom felt. She like burst into tears in the car and she didn't want me to go and she didn't want to kind of drive back home on her own and stuff like that. And it's super emotional moment, but I was like, bye mom. And I was like, ready to go. it's not until years later. I appreciate it. I should tell her before, before she left after this and that, I really appreciate that moment now, but

Rhys:

how's your mom been listening to our podcasts?

Sam:

I don't think so. Not yet. Uh, I think. Because the second one is very technical, that there's not a huge amount of value in listening to it. The first one might be a good lesson, but I think this, this will probably be the first episode that is properly relatable. So I'll probably link to it. The, where am I going with that? Yeah, there was, it was such a horrible building to live in because everything was always broken the kitchen because this is 16. Students sharing one kitchen, like four students sharing one kitchen would be bad enough, but 16, nothing ever worked. Everything was broken. fucking wasted all of the time. So, so everything was in various States of disrepair. The actual kind of rooms we had were very small. We had our own sinks, but didn't have our own toilets. That was a shared toilet as well. The time came to move out. So the, the year had finished and we had to move away for the summer because they reuse those buildings. During the summer holidays, they rent them out to other people nearby. Uh, except this time around, they weren't renting them out. They were bulldozing them to replace with more premium accommodations that the really annoying part of this was we still to get our deposit back. We still had to pass a room inspection. you had to leave it in the state that you found

Rhys:

Oh my God. Even though he was about to be destroyed.

Sam:

Yeah. And they were, they sent letters to us specifically saying like, to get your deposit, but you still have to pass a room inspection. It's like, why are you fucking kidding me? You're you're knocking these buildings down. Why do you care?

Rhys:

See, not, not to go all Jeremy Corbyn, not to go all Jeremy Colbin, but does not exactly demonstrate that this is kind of like a scam on behalf of landlords. You know, I know it's a university in

Sam:

it felt like in that, in that instance, definitely.

Rhys:

money grabbing. They know it's going to be destroyed anyway. Nobody else is going to live there.

Sam:

Oh, but some health and safety thing that says all these rooms must be in a certain style. I'll bug her

Rhys:

well, it's gotta be safe before you destroy it.

Sam:

Yeah, absolutely. You wouldn't want, you wouldn't want it to be unsafe just before it fucking falls to the ground.

Rhys:

What about the mice?

Sam:

So where did you grow up? What was your house like? Growing up?

Rhys:

So I moved around a lot. So to start with, I grew up in, I lived in Colorado for a year, approximately apparently. So I was born in between the age of zero and one. I lived somewhere here in Cardiff. I don't know. I believe it was in the Splott area, which anyone familiar with Cardiff will know is obviously one of the, uh, upper end nicest areas of the city. Um, Hey man, I wasn't even when I don't remember until of course,

Sam:

That is an amazing name.

Rhys:

I mean, Come on, you were in Wales for a long time. You must, you've never

Sam:

I lived, I lived as far as you can be from Cardiff while still being in Wales.

Rhys:

So, so, uh, for those listening, Cardiff is a relatively small city, like the Hulu municipal area. And I was about 400,000 people living in it. Uh, it's relatively small. It is beautiful now. And it's going through, uh, what some people would call. They, they have they've done in Europe. It genuinely is going through a period of like renewal gentrification's I would say know, uh, but it's such, such like a hugely vibrant history and all of the different regions. Uh, I think originally they were independent towns of their own and they've like grown up into, into what is Cardiff. So, uh, there were some that have a reputation based on how rough they were in the past. No longer necessarily the case anymore, but, uh, Splott was one of them when I apparently lived for nearly a year. Uh, Greentown is another, I wander through Grangetown all the time. It's lovely now. Right? It's like, yeah. Lovely area. Uh, other areas, Eley, um, I don't know all these places. I forgot what I was saying, which is why I'm stalling right now. You've been twiddly no, no. The other thing to bear in mind though, a lot of these places, like because of those names, you end up in a lot of other places in Wales that are named after them.

Sam:

Oh, really?

Rhys:

Yeah. So I believe was it really, like, there are a lot of places around you. Like I think there was a Grange town in Merthyr or something, but yeah, there's lots of places that are named that way. I've had it a few times. There's a place around here. Somebody called Greg Cracker and there was a place called when I was growing up. Yeah, there we go. But yeah. Anyway, getting back to where I lived. So I lived in Cardi for a year, apparently, roughly, um, I live from the age of about one until six in the family house, which my father inherited, uh, in caephilly. That was fantastic. Uh, I remember to be honest, I don't really remember a lot of our, either at six. You don't remember it a lot. I don't think, but I do remember the neighbor had two amazing dogs, which were huge. They were big. I don't know my memory is fazey, but I think they were like literature type dogs, like hunting dogs, sort of things. But they were an old couple. We used to call a, uh, it was aunt may

Sam:

The dogs though, the people,

Rhys:

that the people aren't making it, uncle Ron is there haunt me, uncle Ron, certainly, but I

Sam:

You might be thinking of explain it, man.

Rhys:

I might be that is so deeply entrenched. Do you know the other night I was trying to comfort a friend on Instagram, right? Uh, over, over something. I can't remember what it was now. Even this is how terrible a friend I am. And, uh, I passed on this little like quote and I was like, Oh no, I didn't mean it as a quote. I passed on a negative advice and I was like, that sounds like a quote for something. Let me, I'm sure I've picked that up for somewhere. I went and Google day, it was from fucking X men that that's me. Like that's just buried in my psyche somewhere. How long was like, God, for

Sam:

what was the quote?

Rhys:

I can't remember. It was actually heartfelt. It was like, um, Oh yeah, that was it. It was, uh, uh, it was something I'm paraphrasing now. Cause I can't remember the quote, but it was like a you're born alone and you die alone. No. Well you're born on your own and it was somebody like

Sam:

said that you were comforting this friend,

Rhys:

I was because the second half of the quote is that all the matters is the stuff in between. Right. You know, it's like, eh, But a virus like, wow, that does some deep. And I was like, Oh, if I watched something or read something recently that had Darina and I've Googling, and yet I couldn't find an exact version of it. And I'm trying to in different permutations. Yeah. X-Men one of the comics as well, another the movie. So I was like, ah, God, there you go. Anyway, uh, so we lost the family home when I was like six. So we moved to myth avail. Now that was a house.

Sam:

you lost the family home. I am there

Rhys:

Dunno, you know, you don't always know everything that's going on in the family. Uh, when you're at that age, I, I don't know, but I lost the house. Um, so we moved to move to Vail. Now, anyone who doesn't know myth avail, uh, it's uh, close to the site of the app of van disaster to app Yvonne. That made it sound like I was referring to Atlanta's a disaster, but no, there was a disaster in a bovine where. Uh,

Sam:

Is this the school

Rhys:

the school got crushed by landslides. So this is on the opposite side of the Valley from that. Um, so this house was fantastic though, right? Probably of all the physical places I've lived. This house was amazing. So it was a three story house and like all places in London, a long and thin, this was the opposite. This was tall. Right. So just built upwards and it was on the side of a mountain. So it was actually only like two floors on one side, but three floors on the other. If you get me. Right now, this was great. uh, the house was huge and the back garden, the back garden was about 20 meters, 30 meters up to this mountain on the backside, and it had a little gate and it opened onto mountain. Right. There was one path that ran along the back of all the gardens and who should Mount it, uh, which is great. They used to spend the summers out there, you know, going up to all sorts of climbing trees, uh, playing with lizards and snakes. And, you know, I remember bringing a snake on once I was going look at this, and this is like screaming, what are you doing? I'm like, no, it's cool. Um, so then I moved from there, then I moved to Mertha properly. So I moved to an area called Penydarren. Uh, and I went to a primary school. Nearby, uh, which was fantastic. That was great. I liked living there. They were, uh, got up to Latino. Good around that area. That's where like most of my friends ended like my core friends from Mercer. That's where they mostly came from. Then I moved around a few times. I moved to, um, the goodness. The governor state, uh, which is sometimes famous it's, uh, a deprived area to put it mildly. Uh, there was a thing a while ago that suggested that the average life expectancy on this council of state is the same as it currently is in Baghdad. Uh, I'm not sure what that was completely true, but that gives you an impression about how rough that area was. So I stayed there then until I was, um, why didn't you do GCSE stuff, 15 or 16?

Sam:

I think it's 16.

Rhys:

So the year I was doing my GCCS, my mum, who had been living with at that time, I skipped over the bit when my parents got divorced in the middle of all of this, but my mum wanted to move to a Como. Uh, and I didn't. So at that point I moved in with my father, did my GCSE. That's when I moved into that converted pub in penicillin. And, uh, yeah, that was great. So, so me and my dad's from the age of when I was 16 until 20, me and my dad lived together in one of those three flats. My brother lived in one of the other flats in there, and there are two or three leaks, like right on the doorstep. So, uh, I was big into fishing in those lakes all that time. And I always like thinking of, uh, my favorite summer. So my favorite summer, while I was living there, I was doing my master's degree. Uh, so I was. Oh, hang on. My timing is mixed up a bit. Yeah, maybe it was after 20 when I left.

Sam:

you would have been 21,

Rhys:

or 23 or something like that when I moved out. I don't know, whatever. So yeah. Wow. Yeah. I was a child, uh, but my favorite summer was when I was doing my master's degree. Um, The way, my master's degree was taught. It was all done in an annual year. And we taught two modules that are time taught. We learned two modules of time. I say that because I later went on to teach that course. and, uh, you're doing an in blocks. So an eight week block for the first two modules and eight week block for the next two and eight block block for the next two. And then you've got the rest of the year to just write your thesis. So I spent my summer every morning getting up at Dawn. Going fishing for a couple of hours coming back, working on my thesis or as a personal project. Uh, I remember I was doing, do you ever rent a coder and, uh, you know, some other sites like that, it was a site where you would. Uh, write code for money. Basically you would solve small problems at code $400 or a time. And that sort of thing. Uh, I remember I was, I was doing those all day, but that was it. I just remember the summer of being bright, glorious weather. I'd go to uni every, maybe once or twice a week, because there were no classes anymore. It was just when you wanted to go there to, uh, you know, speak to electrodes and stuff wrote my thesis, went fishing every day, wrote code every day. It was the most productive summer of my life. Loved it. And that was what made me want to do a PhD. But yeah, there we go. But that was it. So from there I moved to university, moved around two or three times terrible places in university. And then I moved to my current place six and a half years ago. And my current place is incredible. I love it. I'd never want to leave.

Sam:

I was going to say to you, are you planning on staying there for a long time or do you have plans to move on?

Rhys:

I'm not planning on moving on a few times. I've considered it a, you know, mainly because I wanted to move to London or at one point Bristol, but, uh,

Sam:

Join us.

Rhys:

I decided to get into it and I felt I would stay here. And to be honest, like if I, if I described my place, aside from all the stuff about her being in a pedestrianized area of the city and gay did all these restaurants and stuff nearby, it's a, a duplex. Penthouse apartment. So it's on the top floor of a, a small apartment building. It's got two floors to it. It's got a balcony that overlooks Cardiff castle, um,

Sam:

It is stunning.

Rhys:

and yeah.

Sam:

You're not making it sound as stunning as actually as it is. It is incredible.

Rhys:

huge. Like, like if ever we get to do a video podcast, you'll see either I'm in a, like, it's a two floor room when you think about it. So it's huge. I feel like I'm in a dune in like the Freeman palace or something, you know, it's like,

Sam:

A friend of mine, one of his pieces of feedback on listening to the first episode as a podcast was like, I can hear the room that Reese's it.

Rhys:

Is it, is it does, does it echo? It does a bit. Doesn't it. I'm noticing it

Sam:

do. Do you do definitely get some reverb. It's not bad. I don't think. And I think it distracts or anything like that, but you can tell that you're in quite a big room,

Rhys:

what, what can you do about that other than lightening the walls with like conical styrofoam? W what can you do to minimize that?

Sam:

throw a blanket over yourself.

Rhys:

Nice. I normally save that for my emotional breakdowns, but, uh, I'll happen to bring it out to free improves audio

Sam:

least you're at least you're well-practiced.

Rhys:

But there we go. Yeah. I love this place. I never want to leave. Um, I did hint to my landlord that I might want to buy her at some point in the future. And he goes, Well, let's talk about it then. Um, but, but, but that's my thing. My rent is pretty reasonable for what it is. Uh, it's a really expensive apartment for Cardiff, but compared to the London prices, it's, it's more than reasonable. I think. Um, I know people who live in London, uh, in, you know, barely more than a room, a single room and they pay more in rent than I pay for this place. So, um, but

Sam:

The first, the first flight I lived in, in London, the, so it was an interesting arrangement. it was, uh, you know, the monopoly board, you know, the cheapest square on the monopoly board.

Rhys:

is it it's the Brown ones, uh, is one of them Baker street.

Sam:

Nope. That's a green one. Very expensive

Rhys:

Okay. Uh, I can't remember the Brown ones. All of them.

Sam:

old Kent road,

Rhys:

old Kent road. You live on old Kent road.

Sam:

pounds. I lived, I lived a one and a half minute walk from old Kent road. That's how I used to tell people, Oh, you moved it as a, me to London. Where do you live? I was like, so you, if you played monopoly before. And the, the, the, so the first place I lived, it was a flat with three of us. I mean, two of us, one of the people was the daughter of the landlady. So that was an interesting arrangement. So things got fixed, which was good.

Rhys:

Is that how you paid your rent?

Sam:

Ha um, we did that. We did date for a while. Um, years later

Rhys:

Wow.

Sam:

then, uh, it didn't end.

Rhys:

That sounds like a story I want to hear. I'm sure our viewers, if your mom is listening, I'm sure she'd want to hear that story.

Sam:

Well it's so we lived together for like a year and a half, two years maybe.

Rhys:

When you say live together as a couple or

Sam:

no, no, no. This is, we lived in the same flat, uh, different rooms. We've got to know each other reasonably well. She, she didn't have the best luck with, with guys. Like she kept on chasing guys that were leading her on and not interested. And she was always really upset about this.

Rhys:

and it only went downhill when she started dating you.

Sam:

Yeah. when I moved out, I moved in with some colleagues at the time we still kind of hung out occasionally, eventually it developed into a relationship, but This was the same time I had my mustache, by the way. this, the, I think, you know, it was, there was actual, real feelings that it wasn't an aesthetic thing.

Rhys:

wait. No, it couldn't have been

Sam:

Judges, but it just became clear over a few months that it wasn't really working out. I remember one time being on a bus on the way back from a restaurant, we'd spent the weekend together, heading back to her place. And I said, I think I'll head home and, and, you know, kind of like chill out for an evening before work on Monday. And she just burst out, crying on this bus. I was like, are you okay? I'm sorry, is it something I said? And she's like, you don't want to spend time with me. And I spent the weekend together. I, um, broke up shortly after I was a bit too intense for me. I think. Uh,

Rhys:

I think that's a, you know, like, uh, one of the many things you've got to navigate when you're, uh, when you're dating and trying to establish relationships is, uh, some people are just different in the amount of, in the way the, they spend their free time. Like. I am a sort of person who, aside from being incredibly lazy, I'm tired all the time. Right. All I want to do most of the time is to just sit here and do nothing. Right. I don't even turn the TV on anymore. Cause that's too much hassle. I just like sitting here and just like farting around on Reddit or something. Right. I'm like, because you're just so exhausted by all the other stuff. That's your thing. The number of people who hate that, they hate the idea that I just want to go and be alone. Like, like it's genuinely, like when you're trying to date someone or whatever, like, like, so this is my pet. This is the bit I haven't figured out we're dating yet. Right. I hate dates in the middle of the day dates at night. You could, you can always say, look, it's scary. How late I want to go home or I'm going late. Do you want to come home with me? I'm going late. I'm going home. Do you want to come on with me? Whatever, or whatever time runs out. So it's bookmarked data over, right? When it's in the day, you don't have that. So how do you just politely say. I want to carry on with the rest of my day. Now, can we just stop this right. Coffee's over, right? Like, like the number of times, uh, I've I've pursued things further with a woman than I wanted to purely out of that. I didn't know how to end the date. Right. Uh, it was, it was probably pretty large, but yeah,

Sam:

it's similar to how, if somebody asks you, if you want to go to a party or you want to meet up at some point, you can't say no without an excuse. Like just, I don't feel like doing that is not, is not good enough for some people or they get offended by it. Like, but very frequently, I don't want to leave my house. Like I'm I just want to fucking chill out on my own, especially now I have a kid. It's actually easier now. Cause I haven't, I haven't an 18 year long excuse for not going out. It's wonderful.

Rhys:

Yeah,

Sam:

uh, but I there's a whole bunch of times I got better this as I got older, but, but when I was younger it was always like, Oh, I don't have a good excuse. I better go. And I'd have a shit time because I wasn't feeling it. I was tired or I had other stuff I wanted to be doing or should we just want to just be in my own head for a while, but you're allowed to do that. Like people get very upset.

Rhys:

Yeah. So, so it is something that I learned about myself, which is that even though I don't want in those sort of situations where people are asking you to go out to parties, wherever I always had the same instinct. Now I can't be honest. I just want to stay at home. I universally had a better time if I went out, right? Like everything in my body is telling me, stay at home and be miserable and watch TV and listen to music that makes you think about death or whatever. Right? Like everything in my body is telling me that. I don't want to go out if I go out a universally without, or I can't think of a time when I regretted it after the fact always preferred

Sam:

There's been a whole bunch of times. And like I, so I didn't go out much in university. I didn't, I didn't, I didn't go out drinking a whole lot. Like I did go reasonably frequently a couple times a month maybe, but people expect you to Carly every single night. And I kind of chained drink for five nights in a row. I can't do that. I'm 40. I

Rhys:

Well, I can't do that now. Right back then. I think the reason why I can't do that now is because I did that then

Sam:

Quite possibly, I'm fairly sure I was born with like a 25 year headstart.

Rhys:

Yeah.

Sam:

I am inside. I'm a 40, 50 year old man. I just want to sit at home. I slept drink whiskey. God, it, but at the time I would go out occasionally and I viscerally dislike clubbing. Uh, every, every single time I've been out to a club, I have hated it. And yet I swear I've done it on about a dozen occasions in my life. And it's just not my jam. I don't understand what I'm supposed to do while I'm there. Like you can't, you can't go up and get a drink without waiting for half an hour. You can't talk to people. It's too loud. I realize I sound like such an old

Rhys:

Well, the way, the way I would frame this as you and me, uh, I hope you don't mind me saying this, but I think you and me have the same curse. You know, we're not people who look particularly attractive. We rely on our charm, our conversation I'll wit our intelligence and the club just, no, they takes all of our weapons away from us.

Sam:

We was like recently we were having a conversation over WhatsApp and I was like, I was referring to the Jim Jeffrey sketchy the Australian comedian. Um, he's got a sketch about how he's a five it's like, I've got eyes that aren't sparkle, but they in the same direction, I'm a five

Rhys:

Oh man.

Sam:

I've I've, I've got a face it's not attractive, but it's symmetrical five.

Rhys:

The the, the, the punchline of our thing is where he says, like, one of the best encounters he ever had was when he slept with a woman, he's a five, he slept with a nine or a 10 best moment of his life, you know, cheering, medals, et cetera. Uh, and the worst moment of his life is when he slept with her too. And he was like, that took some getting over. That was, Ooh, that was a rough summer, you know, but then he realizes at some point, you know, when he's trying to reflect on his objectification of women and stuff, he reflects that the best moment of his encounter of when he slept with a nine or a 10, that was for her, the equivalent of him having slept with the two. Right. Like that was probably her at rock bottom was him. Yeah. I wonder about those things sometimes, you know, like I've got some memory, some wonderful memories of dating and I'm like, yeah, that's a good one. That that's what I'm going to, you know, I nearly said tell the grandkids, I would never tell their stories to grandkids. You know, it's like, that's, that's weird. Gather around children. Let me tell you about that time. When I. A time when I, uh, smashed ass, you know, you're just, uh, yeah. Uh, you, you just wouldn't, but those are memories I would hold on to it. And there is that bit in the back of my hand was like, I wonder if I wonder if I really hope so, but I wonder if they view it the same way. Yeah, probably not.

Sam:

I grew up in North Wales. I, so I did, I saw, I said, I earlier, when I said I grew up in the same house for 18 years, not strictly true. I did live in a different house for the first year, but obviously I don't remember it. I can, I asleep for most of it. And the house I grew up in for the first year was in a place called Robyn, which is in North Wales. And then we moved to the place where I actually kind of really grew up in. Um, and it's this really small village. Uh, it, it's kind of named, that's not at all pronounced how it's spelled, which is quite common in Wales. The population is all conservative voters. Uh, basically no minorities of any kind, a very homogenous community. And I went to a nice school. There was a couple of high schools there got a reasonably good education. Didn't didn't do like amazingly well, but you know, reasonably academic kind of kid, but they had the house we grew up in. Was really nice. It was an old council house that they use to, so key workers would live in it, which it seems we have theme throughout my life, but my mum was a police officer and she bought the house off the council at a, I think at like a relatively reduced rate. And that's the house that we lived in when we grew up, I had

Rhys:

presumably under the right to buy. Then the reason why none of us can buy houses now

Sam:

I have no idea. Uh, it was a three bed. It had a conservatory, but that, that conservatory was added by us, quite late into how we had it. There was a really nice fireplace in the living room and it was really nice kitchen. It was overall like a lovely house and moved out when I was 18, went to a bunch of different places and it didn't occur to me until I'd moved away. That. When I came back, I actually realized the house is very small, but all the time that I grown up in it never felt small because you never really, I don't know you first, I don't know about you, but the first impression lasts, right? Like I've known people from when they were essentially kind of babies, toddlers. Right. And now they're actually like grown human beings in their teen years, but you look at them and like, it's still a first impression when I met you. When you were about six years old. And I still see that person when I see you, it's a, it's a hard thing to shake and this house was the same thing. It never felt small when I was growing up, but going back to it, it is actually a relatively small house. Uh, so that was an interesting realization that I had. It's still like a really nice house, really nice house to grow up in my parents, put a lot of time and effort into doing it. And. As a modern house when they bought it, it was obviously quite old, old wallpaper and old carpets. And just generally, you know, of the time, but then time moves on houses, move on as well. Uh, my own soul did recently, actually a couple of years ago, sold it to somebody else in the neighborhood. Uh, so yeah, occasionally I haven't been back there for a long time, but back when I was kind of visiting home, uh, cause my mom doesn't live anymore and my dad lives. Not near that state. So there's not really much reason to go there, but yeah, the last time I did walk past it, it looks more or less the same, uh, all the way down to on the, we had a driveway that ran the F like down the length of the house. So, so if you imagine the house, the driveway comes in. Uh, and it goes all the way down the left side of the house, as you look at it. And then at the very end of that, there was a garage. So we had this massive driveway. Then we had a basketball hoop on the side of the house, but for like, it's had been there for a long time. And the hoop had long since kind of like come out of it. So the wood had broken and the hoop fell off, but the actual backboard is still up there. Uh, so little details like that, I still know which is nice.

Rhys:

You've just reminded me of some of those memories from the house I lived in until I was six. Um, so there's a couple of years out the back garden, whereas like a normal back garden, relatively small, but it had a Hill, a really steep Hill, like a 45 degree angle Hill. And then he went flat again, it was clearly artificial. They might have been like a, I don't know, maybe it'd been a railway there or something in the past. Right. It's clearly artificial at the back of the top garden up there. We had like a robot patch so I can remember my mum used to make us rhubarb crumble all the time with our own homegrown. Uh, rhubarb, uh, someone else, seriously, you mentioning the driveway there and just how it was constructed has brought this back. I haven't thought about this in years, but one of my favorite memories was my brother was big into, um, cycling at the time. So I know I was six when we moved away from there. My brother is seven years older than me. So he was probably around 15 at the time at most, probably more like 13, 14. I can remember what happened was where the Fort with a 45 degree Hill was. There was also steps on one side. And then there was also a concrete pathway from the top of that Hill, the ran alongside our house. Right? So if you were at the front of the house, you could walk along this pathway and you'd come past our garden and you'd look down into the bottom side of the garden and he would carry on, walk in and be on the top side of the garden. Now there was no barrier or fence along this little pathway. So the way our house was was, I can remember, we used to like push our bins into that bit by those steps. So when you needed to take the Bittons out, I had to pull her up the steps and then pull her along this pathway. Now I can remember my brother while our bikes and stuff would be stored in the garden. And I can remember my brother, uh, Pushing his bike and he got on his bike a bit early, so he's like half peddling, half walking with the bike along this little pathway. I can remember he just starts to stumble. And I remember he fell down this thing, which was probably about 10 feet on two pins. Right. I can just remember the site of the bike sort of bounced away and out of it. So there's my brother with just his leg in the air amongst of the bin.

Sam:

There was a, so there's basketball hoop. I was talking about. I, so our driveway. And the driveway of next door we're directly connected to each other, but the driveway next door was raised by about a foot. So you had this like massive, it wasn't like a stair size. It was massive. Step up into the next driveway. And for the longest time, there was no fence or anything. And next door were nice people. They didn't really particularly mind. We occasionally used their driveway as well for the basketball. Uh, and they, uh, eventually at some point there had been a fence there. So there were the pillars for a fence if you wanted to put one up, but there wasn't actually one, there just the pillars. And over time, one of the pillars had kind of like eroded a little bit and one of the. The screws that bolted it into the pavement was, was exposed. And I remember one day, a lifelong friend of mine, me and him playing basketball. You can see where this is going, but it kind of jumped shot backwards, like a fadeaway shot straight onto this exposed. It's like, it's like a screw. It wasn't a nail, but it was. He tuck his calf open. It was horrible. Like massive cut down his cough and, uh, yeah, that was bad.

Rhys:

My brother did one once where, um, it's weird how all the stories from my youth where someone gets injured, my brother is involved. Right. But, um, Oh actually that reminds me of a really weird coincidence. I didn't tell you about, um, in the entire six and a half years, I've lived here. I've probably had 10 different neighbors might make maybe. I lied a little bit earlier, my penthouse apartment to shade on the top floor. So my apartment is one apartment. There's another pen as apartment next to it as well. Uh, and, uh, that's been held under short term tenancy agreements for the last six and a half years. So I think about 10 people have lived in there over the years, some good, some bad, but finally they've given a longterm lease. Great. Get to have like some stability. Am I gonna have nutters in there? And, uh, there's been someone in there for the last, um, 15 weeks now. I don't know how many months are, is off the top of my head. Four or five. I don't know, weeks days. What do they mean anymore? But, uh, anyway, so, uh, I've been out on my. Terrorists a lot with my barbecue. And I've been tracking to these new guys who were moved in and it turns out that the guy who was moved in, there's a couple who's moved in. And the guy in the couple, um, we've been chatting. It turns out coincidentally, not only is he from Mitha, he was best mates with my brother when they were in school together. What a fantastic coincidence. Right?

Sam:

that's

Rhys:

How cool is that? But he's been telling me all these stories about my brother, but anyway, back to the one, when I, when I was a kid. So, um, again, I was less than six years old. I was probably like four at the time. My brother probably like 12 at the time. And there was this like, uh, uh, the area of caephilly we lived in, you had this old, uh, like an abandoned mine, like it'd been left to dereliction, you know, and they would all like rail tracks nearby and stuff that were all derelict now. Uh, and we used to go playing around there all the time. And I can remember my brother one day, uh, I don't know where we were doing. We were running around as, as people are sort of age. Do you know yet? Jumping. Oh, look, something dangerous. Let's grab that. We're both hands or whatever. I can remember him just jumping off something and landing on a plank of wood and this nail going directly through his foot. And I could see it through his trainer, like right up through his trainer. Like, Holy shit. Now the thing is, when you like. What was I, I must have been five, six, four, five, six, something like that. I wouldn't have been outside at four would I, I don't know if whatever, uh, that sort of age anyway, I always say good. Cool. Wow. Turns out it was a rusty nail yet to have like all sorts of, I think he had tetanus yet everything after it, but yeah, I can remember doing that. I can remember going watch this.

Sam:

I buy some, I have a sister a little bit older than me, although I tell people she's younger and it's very believable. She does look a bit younger than me.

Rhys:

I would have assumed she was younger than you.

Sam:

it.

Rhys:

Yeah.

Sam:

I probably told you before that she's younger than me. Uh, people believe it. It's awesome. She hates it. We, we must've been about eight, nine years old, something like that. And we were playing in a field behind one of my mom's friend's houses. Which is relatively close to where we lived at the time. And there was, you know, how in, in, in farmer's fields and stuff like that, between fields you'll have a, almost like a trench to kind of delineate where the fields are.

Rhys:

Yeah,

Sam:

there was one of those. Yeah, exactly. That was one of those. And in the middle of it was barbed wire and Reese's face has just dropped the. Ditch was quite big and we were kind of like, you were going into it and, you know, jumping out of it and stuff like that. And my sister kind of went over into the ditch. Uh, I was still on her feet running down the ditch, but she kind of like. Bumped into the barbed wire fence. And she got a Bob from the Bob wire right next to her. I like, so, so you know where your, I kind of connect to your nose, like where your tear duct size. She, she, she got Bob straight in there so close to her eye and there was so much blood blood. Literally pouring out of this and I freak the fuck out. Like we rushed her back to my mom's friend's house and helpless, and there was no one to do it like eight years old. And, uh, yeah, I got really worked up about that. Cause I thought she had damaged her eye. Cause you couldn't tell us so much blood. Uh, yeah, that was, that was a bad one. She's got a Scarlet this day. Like if you look close, you can see it.

Rhys:

I've never noticed that.

Sam:

No, it's not super obvious, but if you look for it, it's those like a bit of scar tissue by her nose?

Rhys:

So you've reminded me there have a good one that I only go to reminded over the other day. So, uh, through lockdown, uh, I've been shaving my hair, uh, on I've given myself an undercut. It's terrible. It's uh, an importance. Well, yeah, I get mixed reviews. Some people tell me it looks good. Some people tell me it's worse than the Holocaust. I mean, you know, I'm sure there's a gray area in the middle of it. Anyway, while I've been doing it. Um, I've noticed I've got, I'm trying to show you on camera now. I'm not sure if it's coming across, but I put a really cool sky.

Sam:

Yeah, I can see that.

Rhys:

Yeah. Now, uh, what that one is, I'm actually going on the other side, but it's not visible into my hair, but, um, Well, I went to his cell. Uh, I used to go fishing with my brother quite a lot. And we'd do like night fishing. We'd fish for say two or three days in a row. All of these stories involve my brother. Right. Cause he's. Him. Um, so we used to go fishing for two or three days in a row or whatever, you know, you're camping out overnight. And, uh, the type of fishing you do, it was carp fishing at the time. Um, you basically, you cast your rods out, you put them on these electronic devices, that the beep if the line moves, so you can go to sleep and they wake you up. If you get a run as you call it when the fish strikes. So whatever. Uh, but of course, after you've done this for like two or three days, you get a little bit bored. Everyone goes a little bit crazy. Right? You do steps. So we were fishing this Lake one time. Um, I can't remember what its official name was. We used to call it the BP pond. Cause it was right next to a BP garage. Uh, the is gone now, there was a as part of that summit, one of the mining operations in Murtha, they filled her in. Unfortunately we used to fish there all the time, day three or whatever, a fishing went a little bit bored. You always got, have the nonsense. You always go a little bit crazy. It doesn't matter too much. He rods or attended, you know, there'll beep if there's sufficient, whatever. So we decided for whatever reason, Uh, we wanted to catch a sheep cause they were always sheep, like running around nearby. Right. Not, not stop it.

Sam:

it's all such a stereotype wreath.

Rhys:

W what we're used to like doing was like grab initiative and we serve them in the Lake and they swim around and it's completely safe. They know how to swim. It's fine. I dunno why we found enjoyment in it, but that was what we would do anyway. She productively surprisingly hard to catch they're nimble, like they changed direction anyway. So we're running around trying to do this. And the method that we had, uh, was what you would do is you'd throw stones. Uh, so if the sheep is jumping in, when running off in one direction, you throw a stone in front of them, they don't change direction again, which means you have to catch. Right. So there was me and my brother and this other guy, Chris, uh, one of our mates who was with us. So how old would I have been? I probably would have been about, uh, 16, maybe a little bit older. I dunno, my brother. 2020 full five, something like that. And this, this guy, Chris is throwing these stones. Me and my brother are trying to chase the sheep in this field. And I can have a crisis getting bored, annoyed, frustrated, cause it was all going badly or whatever. And he threw this stone and a want me right in the sight of my head right

Sam:

is that what that is?

Rhys:

That's all that is now. I couldn't remember. Um, I don't think it knocked me out. I've been knocked out two or three times, you know, I used to, uh, I, I, yeah, I've, I've been knocked out a few times and I know what memories of being knocked out feel like. I think I was conscious that a little time for this, but Jesus Christ, the amount of blood that came out of her blood was everywhere. Man. There was so much blood. It was unbelievable. And I can remember

Sam:

prominent scar.

Rhys:

it really is like, no.

Sam:

maybe don't be saying it's very noticeable.

Rhys:

Yeah, it's great. Isn't it? It makes you look old, rugged and yeah. But, um, yeah, that, that was my memory of it. Like I can remember, I can remember. Uh, there've been very few times in my life when I felt not in control of my body. Like even when you're drunk, you've got control of your body. Uh, the only times I can think of when I've not been in control of my body is when I've been absolutely exhausted. So if you've, uh, I used to train my day and, uh, the conditioning sessions in those things, when you're so exhausted, the legs will move. You seen those videos of marathon runners where they can't keep their body up anymore. And that sort of thing. Um, there was a time when I got hit in the liver as well, and my body. No longer responded to my requests. Right? That's the only way I can describe it. Right? Your body is doing what it needs to do. It's crumpling up in a ball. You're there going? No, no, no. Stand up. And it's just like, Nope, Nope, your body just did it. It was like, I was speaking a different language or something. It was such a bizarre experience. And there was this time where, um, I can remember the stone hitting me and my body just crumpled. And I can remember feeling like. I wouldn't say fine. Right? Like, like there was something wrong, but I didn't feel like I shouldn't be in control and I'm trying to move my hand and my arm is just like, Oh my God, what's going on? You're trying to lift your arm one way, like upwards and your arm is just going in different directions, you know, looking back on it. I was clearly concussed, but, um, yeah, I don't even think I went to the hospital for that. I'm not sure. I can't remember, but yeah.

Sam:

Thank you so much for joining us for episode three and future, we really want to take the episodes in this character direction. Having a theme, talking about how it's affected us throughout our lives. If you liked it, let us know if you didn't like it. Let us know as well on Twitter. I am Sam who S I M w H O O. And Reese is Reese Jeff's that's R H Y S J E double F F. Any suggestions, just let us know and we will see you next time.

Horrible House Stories
Smart Mirrors
The Joys of Moving House
University Accommodation
Childhood Homes
Dating Housemates
Childhood Homes (Redux!)